This is Your Wake Up Call!
Listen

Miracles Do Happen

keKatherine Ellington
John 11:38-57

When someone has a sudden life-threatening illness family and/or close friends become a caregiving team by assuming positions of concern and support. Acts of love involve being present, offering comfort and direct care. While doctors and nurses work at medical diagnosis and treatment, the caregiving team establishes a web of support at the bedside more often also involving those who are trained to help in ministering as well as caring for patients (e.g. pastoral care ministers, social workers and therapists). Caregiving teams bear witness to the pain and suffering of the patient, and respond by doing all they can do to enable healing. When death seems inevitable, but a miracle of recovery occurs it offers new meaning for life. Spectacular accounts often make headline news.

Lazarus’ sisters Mary and Martha were women of faith and this family had been close friends with Jesus. When Lazarus got sick his loving sisters cared for him. When he died, his sisters wrapped their brother in the customary burial garment and laid him in a tomb behind a stone wall. At their urging Jesus came, but he arrived four days later to find Mary and Martha overwhelmed with grief and He wept. He removed the stone and with prayer, Jesus called Lazarus to life from the dead for the glory of God. The news of this miracle spread quickly among the Jewish community during Passover at a time when there many gatherings.

Miracles are evidence of power beyond human experience to move forces greater than the depths of our understanding or control. Miracles are life-saving. Miracles address the needs of those who are closest to the situation, but the encounter offers an opportunity for hope and increasing faith to all those who choose to believe.

Katherine Ellington
New York, NY
worldhousemedicine.blogspot.com



Bookmark and Share

Leave a Reply

Bookmark and Share